The Society of Biblical Literature was founded in 1880 to foster biblical scholarship.
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About SBL

The Society of Biblical Literature is the oldest and largest international scholarly membership organization in the field of biblical studies. Founded in 1880, the Society has grown to over 8,500 international members including teachers, students, religious leaders and individuals from all walks of life who share a mutual interest in the critical investigation of the Bible.
Educational Resources

SBL Members Syllabi Collection

Syllabus: a summary outline of a course of study, a document to communicate what the course is about, why the course is taught, where it is going, and what will be required of the students for them to complete the course with a passing grade.

Many SBL members teach the Bible, in public universities, seminaries, colleges, and private schools. They have contributed their syllabi to this collection so all teachers can find a place to get ideas for revising their existing syllabi or creating new ones. 

Read an article from The Chronicle on creating a syllabus with a spreadsheet and calendar app.
Here is another one from The Chronicle on Creative Approaches to the Syllabus.

Bible and Religion Introductions
Early Judaism
Hebrew Bible/Old Testament
Intertestamental Texts
Issues in Religion and Biblical Interpretation
Language and Translation
Mediterranean Societies in Biblical Times
New Testament
The Social World of Ancient Israel
Other Syllabi Projects

 


Bible and Religion Introductions

  • Understanding Scripture (RLST 110), Taught by Robert von Thaden, Jr., Assistant Professor of Religious Studies at Mercyhurst College, Erie, PA, for around 35 first and second year undergraduates.

  • Introduction to Religious Studies (RST 101), Taught by Jonathan Lawrence, Canisius College as the required core introduction to religious studies, generally not until second semester of first year at earliest. Taught to sections of about 25 students (and in abbreviated form in Summer session). Assignments and rubrics available on request.

  • REL 100: Introduction to Christianity
    Taught by Sam Thomas, California Lutheran University, for a required introductory course.

  • REL 101: Introduction to the Bible
    Taught by Jane S. Webster, Associate Professor of Religion and Philosophy, Barton College.

  • The Bible as Story (external link)
    Taught by Annette Yoshiko Reed, University of Pennsylvania, for a 200 level course at McMaster University, cross-listed with Religious Studies and Comparative Literature.

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Early Judaism

 

  • Introduction to Early Judaism (SS 909 / HT 909). Taught by Jonathan Lawrence, at Christ the King Seminary as a summer course (2006) for lay graduate students (7 students). Assignments and rubrics available on request.

  • AHUM 1716: Exploring Religion: Early Judaism
    Taught by Dan W. Clanton, Jr., Arapahoe Community College. This class was taught at the University of Denver as a a general Arts & Humanities class designed for 10-25 first-year students. This class covered the literature and history of the 2nd Temple Period.

  • REL 311: The Pentateuch - The Torah and Its Interpretation
    Taught by Sam Thomas, California Lutheran University, for upper-division majors and non-majors.

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Hebrew Bible/Old Testament

  • 6AAT3051 Women in the Hebrew Bible  Taught by Sandra Jacobs. This syllabi is copyrighted to the Department of Theology and Religious Studies at King’s College, London.

  • RS 207: Old Testament. Taught by Ken Diable, Mount Aloysius College, Cresson, PA. Class is taken by undergraduate students to fulfill religion requirements for graduation.Class size averages 35-40 students per term.

  • Introduction to the Old Testament (RST 200), Taught by Jonathan Lawrence, Canisius College as a religious studies core elective to be taken after the required core introduction to religious studies (world religions). Has been taught several times in Fall semester to sections of about 30 students (and in abbreviated form in Summer session). This course is writing (and grading) - intensive, but has been well-received. The concept for this course came from a syllabus posted on the AAR syllabus website by Peter Haas.

  • REL 101: Literature and World of the Old Testament (external link- Missouri State University Website)
    Taught by Victor H. Matthews, Missouri State University, for an introductory course for 40 students in regular sessions and 22 in Honors sections.

  • R210: Introduction to the Hebrew Bible/Old Testament
    Taught by Taylor Halverson, Indiana University, as a general elective for undergraduate students or as a potentially required course for Religious Studies majors consisting of up to 30 students.

  • REL 1110: Introduction to the Old Testament/Tanakh
    Taught by Rhonda Burnette-Bletsch, Greensboro College, for undergraduate students consisting of up to 20 first and second year students.

  • The Five Books of Moses (external link)
    Taught by Annette Yoshiko Reed, University of Pennsylvania, for a 200 level course at McMaster University.

  • AHUM 1716 (2): Exploring Religion: Biblical Texts
    Taught by Dan W. Clanton, Jr., Arapahoe Community College. This class was taught at the University of Denver as a a general Arts & Humanities class designed for 10-25 first-year students. This class was designed as an introduction to Torah and Jewish interpretations of Torah.

  • REL 312: Ecstasy, Interpretation and Artifice: Prophetic Experience and the Prophetic Word in the Hebrew Bible and Beyond
    Taught by Sam Thomas, California Lutheran University, for upper-division majors and non-majors.

  • REL 312: Hebrew Prophets (external link- Missouri State University Website)
    Taught by Victor H. Matthews, Missouri State University, for an upper level course.

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Intertestamental Texts 

  • Syllabi requested
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New Testament

  • RS 105: New Testament. Taught by Ken Diable, Mount Aloysius College, Cresson, PA. Class is taken by undergraduate students to fulfill religion requirements for graduation.Class size averages 35-40 students per term.

  • REL358: The Book of Revelation.  Taught by Ralph J. Korner in 2005 and 2006 in his role as Adjunct Instructor of New Testament at Taylor University College, a private liberal arts college in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada.The course is intended for third or fourth year BA in Religion and Theology students. Class sizes averaged 10 students. Students have taken NT Literature and Hermenutics prerequisites.

  • Introduction to the New Testament (RST 210), Taught by Jonathan Lawrence, Canisius College as a religious studies core elective to be taken after the required core introduction to religious studies (world religions). Has been taught several times in Spring semester to sections of about 30 students (and in abbreviated form in Summer session). This course is writing (and grading) - intensive, but has been well-received. The concept for this course came from a syllabus posted on the AAR syllabus website by Peter Haas.

  • REL 112: Introduction to the New Testament
    Taught by Lynn R. Huber, Assistant Professor of Religious Studies Elon University, North Carolina, for around 33 first and second year undergraduates.

  • PHIL 1696: Introduction to the New Testament
    Taught by Jane S. Webster, Associate Professor of Religion and Philosophy, Barton College.

  • REL 326: The Life & Thought of Paul: Body, Sin, & Sexuality
    Taught by Lynn R. Huber, Assistant Professor of Religious Studies Elon University, North Carolina, for up to 33 upper level undergraduates.

  • NT511: New Testament I
    Taught by Russell Morton, Ashland Theological Seminary

  • NT512: New Testament II
    Taught by Russell Morton, Ashland Theological Seminary

  • NT620: Exegesis of the Book of Revelation
    Taught by Russell Morton, Ashland Theological Seminary
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Language and Translation

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Mediterranean Societies in Biblical Times

 

  • Syllabi requested
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Issues in Religion and Biblical Interpretation

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The Social World of Ancient Israel
Social World of Ancient Israel (external link- Sage Journals Website)
 
Other Syllabi Projects:
  •  The Wabash Center has a syllabi collection included in The Internet Guide to Religion. (To start it may be easier to Browse by Subject and see the syllabi listed, than to try and search the syllabi by keyword.)
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Submission Details

Please submit your syllabi in PDF, Word format or as a web link, whatever is most convenient to you, but we would ask that beforehand you check with your institutions that they would not find such a move on your part objectionable. We would further ask that you give us the following supporting information:
  • The type of institution in which you work (liberal arts college, university [private or public], seminary, church foundation [with denomination], etc.
  • The sequence of years this course has run (or is planned for)
  • The year/level of the students
  • The typical number of students
  • Any other characteristics of your course that you would like to mention
  • Your citation preference
Please e-mail your contributions to: 
Heather McKay or Sharon Johnson

or mail to:
Sharon Johnson
Society of Biblical Literature
825 Houston Mill Road
Atlanta, GA 30329

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