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Congresses

2011 International Meeting

London, United Kingdom

Meeting Begins: 7/3/2011
Meeting Ends: 7/7/2011

Note that the deadline for paper proposals is 11:59 PM (23:59) Eastern Standard Time (UTC -5) on the day PREVIOUS to the deadline below.


Call For Papers Opens: 10/1/2010
Call For Papers Closes: 2/1/2011
Requirements for Participation

Program Units

 

Ancient Near East

Jacob L. Wright
Description: The ancient Near East section explores the texts and material culture of the ancient world, especially Egypt, the Levant, Anatolia, and Mesopotamia from the birth of writing through the Hellenistic period. Our aim is to study the ancient world with a variety of methods and from a variety of perspectives—anthropological, archaeological, art-historical, economic, legal, literary, philological, sociohistorical, etc. We welcome work that reads the literature or material culture of one region against another, as well as work that is more limited in scope. Each year, we anticipate hosting two panels: one devoted to any aspect of the study of the ancient Near East, and one focussing on a more narrowly defined theme, region, approach, or time period.

Call for papers:

Tags: Anatolian (Hittite, Luwian, Hurrian) (Ancient Near Eastern Literature - Region), Ancient Near East - Bronze Age (History & Culture), Ancient Near East - Hellenistic Period (History & Culture), Ancient Near East - Iron Age (History & Culture), Ancient Near East - Late Antiquity (History & Culture), Ancient Near East - Neo-Assyria (History & Culture), Ancient Near East - Neo-Babylonia (History & Culture), Aramaic (Philology / Linguistics (incl. Semiotics)), Comparative Approaches (Interpretive Approaches), Egyptian (Philology / Linguistics (incl. Semiotics)), Hebrew (classical) (Philology / Linguistics (incl. Semiotics)), Latter Prophets - Ezekiel (Biblical Literature - Hebrew Bible/Old Testament/Greek OT (Septuagint)), Northwest Semitic - Canaanite (Phoenician, Punic, Moabite, Ammonite) (Ancient Near Eastern Literature - Region), Social-Scientific Approaches (Anthropology, Sociology, Psychology) (Interpretive Approaches), Torah/Pentateuch - Genesis (Biblical Literature - Hebrew Bible/Old Testament/Greek OT (Septuagint))

Ancient Near Eastern Iconography and the Bible

Izaak J. de Hulster
Joel M. LeMon
Description: This section, formerly titled Iconography and the Bible, examines the ways that ancient pictorial material informs interpretations of biblical texts and vice-versa. We welcome papers that explore the relationships between iconographic and textual materials as well as papers that deal exclusively with iconographic issues.

Call for papers: This consultation examines the ways that ancient pictorial material informs interpretations of biblical texts. For our open session, we welcome papers that explore the relationships between iconographic and textual materials as well as papers that deal exclusively with iconographic issues which inform the historical background of the Hebrew Bible. We will also convene a special session on numismatics, for which we welcome papers as well.

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Apocalyptic Literature

Anathea Portier-Young
Greg Carey
Description: The Apocalyptic Literature Section provides the International Meeting’s only general forum for studies related to apocalyptic literature. The Section welcomes papers that engage the wide range of apocalyptic texts, that provide analysis of the history and conventions of apocalyptic literature, and that employ diverse methodological perspectives.

Call for papers: Forthcoming

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Apocrypha and Pseudepigrapha

Kelley N. Coblentz Bautch
Tobias Nicklas
Description: The Section fosters ongoing study of extra-canonical texts, as subjects of literary and philological investigation; as evidence for the history of religion, theology, and cult practice; and as documents of the socio-symbolic construction of traditions along lines of class and gender.

Call for papers: For the 2011 meeting, the Apocrypha and Pseudepigrapha Section will feature a session with invited papers on the provenance of Pseudepigrapha as Jewish, Christian or other; participants, examining particular texts, engage, challenge or extend the work of Robert Kraft, James Davila and others who have pursued methodological questions concerning the study of so-called "Pseudepigrapha" and historical background. A second session with a panel discussion concerns "Religious Experience in Apocryphal, Pseudepigraphal and Related Texts"; this is a joint session with the Religious Experience in Early Judaism and Early Christianity Section of the Annual Meeting of the SBL. Additionally, we welcome proposals that take up the critical study of texts associated with the Apocrypha and Pseudepigrapha for open sessions.

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Archaeology

Ann E. Killebrew
Margreet Steiner
Description: This unit is designed to encourage conversation and collaboration between collaboration between archaeologists and biblical scholars. Our definition of “archaeology” is broad, so we also include papers that present historical reconstructions using archaeological and textual data. Our stated goal is for all of the participants to address how their focused research in archaeology or biblical studies relates to the work of specialists in other areas. To date our sessions have included approximately an equal number of field archaeologists and textual specialists. The sessions thus promote dialogue between the presenters and the participants in the audience. The dialogue includes hermeneutical and historical discussions.

Call for papers: This year we want to devote a special session to Ancient Israel and the impact from the north. In ancient Israel and the neighbouring kingdoms of Ammon and Moab cultural influence from the south (Egypt) and the west (Phoenicia) have been attested in the archaeological record, both in texts and the material culture such as objects and architecture. Politically the influence of the from the north - Aram, Assyria - had a far greater impact. The material culture, however, does not seem to reflect that influence. How is that possible? Have scholars been too focused on the biblical picture that stresses Phoenician relationships to pay attention to cultural ties with the Arameans and the Assyrians? Are we overlooking cultural traits that point northwards? Or did those mighty kingdoms really leave very little trace of their interference with the southern countries? This session is inviting papers on cultural relations of ancient Israel and neighbouring countries with their northern overlords. Papers on other subjects are also welcome.

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Assyriology and the Bible

Dr. F. Rachel Magdalene
Description: The Assyriology and the Bible Consultation desires to gather together the far-flung papers that deal with Mesopotamian-related topics. In addition to encouraging traditional comparative work related to historiographic, philological, literary and religious studies, it wishes to invite new methods to examine both the conventional areas of research and newer questions related to Orientalism, postcolonial studies, and other ideological areas. This Consultation seeks to generate strongly interdisciplinary research between the Assyriological, biblical studies, and archaeological guilds. Papers relevant to one of the fields but which would provoke thought in the others are welcome, in addition to regular comparative papers. Any paper related to the societies whose languages were written in cuneiform script or the related Semitic scripts are invited.

Call for papers: This year, for our inaugration, we will have three sessions. Sessions 1 & 2 will be both an invited and an open session on the topic “The Neo-Babylonian Corpus and the Bible.” We invite papers for the open session dealing with any aspect of, and using any method on, the large corpus of Neo-Babylonian documents or the Bible from the time of either the Neo-Babylonian or Persian periods. Session 3 is an open call for papers on any topic of comparative Mesopotamian, Hittite, or biblical history, philology, literature, or religion. Other panel ideas and proposals are welcome.

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Bethsaida Excavations Project

Rami Arav
Description: The Bethsaida Excavations unit reports on the current progress of the dig and on topics related to the history and traditions of Bethsaida.

Call for papers: The Bethsaida Excavations unit reports on the current progress of the dig and on topics related to the history and traditions of Bethsaida.

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Bible and Empire

C.L. Crouch
Jonathan Stökl
Description: A unit examining the influence of imperial political powers on the development of the Bible in its historical context as well as the Bible’s use and reception throughout subsequent history.

Call for papers: For the 2011 IM in London, there will be at least two sessions. Session I is designed to examine the influence of imperial political powers on the development of the Hebrew Bible in its historical context. This year special attention will be paid to Neo-Assyria, but papers relating to other imperial powers in the ancient Near East are also welcome. Session II is designed to examine the use and reception of the Bible in the context of the British Empire: from the perspective of those subjected to British imperial power as well as by empire-builders themselves. The sessions will eventually be published; the deadline to submit final manuscripts will probably be around October 1, 2011. Abstracts should be submitted via the SBL website in the usual way, no later than 31 January. Queries may be addressed to the chairs (clc65@cam.ac.uk, j.stokl@ucl.ac.uk).

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Bible and Its Influence: History and Impact

Andrew Mein
Mary Mills
Description: This unit offers a forum for papers on both the theory of reception studies and critical analysis of historical and contemporary case studies related to the Bible’s use and influence, in spheres ranging from art, literature and music to religion, society and culture.

Call for papers: This programme unit explores the ways in which the Bible has had an impact on wider social and cultural issues. These may be aesthetic, political or linguistic in nature. For the 2011 meeting papers are especially encouraged on the influence, historically and culturally, of the KJV - as a particular edition of the English Bible and also as a resource for later literature and social movements. Papers which relate in a less specific way to the scope of the unit will also be considered.

Tags: History of Interpretation (Interpretive Approaches)

Bible and the Moving Image

Mark Leuchter
Description: The Bible and the Moving Image unit, titled the Bible and Cinema until 2011, is devoted to the use, influence, and development of biblical texts, motifs, and themes in the various media of the moving image, including cinema throughout its history, television, and the interactive narratives of gaming media.

Call for papers: The Bible and Cinema unit will be scheduling a special session dedicated to the legacy of Biblical themes in post-World War II British cinema and is not accepting paper proposals at this time.

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Bible and Visual Culture

J. Cheryl Exum
Martin O'Kane
Description: The Bible and Visual Culture is premised on the recognition that some of the most engaging and creative interpretations of biblical texts are to be found in visual media from antiquity to the present. Further encouragement to attend to visual interpretations of the Bible is offered by our awareness that such readings have often captured the collective and especially popular imagination to a far greater extent than have many written interpretations and in doing so, these visualizations have shaped and influenced our reading and understanding of the biblical texts themselves. The section offers an academic space for the critical exploration and discussion of biblical texts, characters, motifs and themes as they are represented in visual media including (but not limited to) painting, sculpture, print making, illustration, moving pictures (including film, television and gaming), advertising, street art and other expressions of visual culture. The section welcomes efforts to situate visual interpretations of the Bible within a wider hermeneutical context and to explore the ways in which such interpretations challenge or support other non-visual readings of biblical texts. The nature of the subject explored in this section demands an openness to the insights of a range of different approaches and disciplines beyond biblical studies, including (but again, not limited to) art history, psychology, film, theatre as well as studies in gender and postcolonialism.

Call for papers: In view of the quarter-centenary of the translation of the King James Bible in 1611, we invite papers on two subjects: (1) papers that explore illustrations commissioned to accompany the text of the KJB over the centuries, for example, William Blake (or illustrations in various translations of the KJB into other languages); (2) papers that explore the representation of the Bible in visual form from the first half of the seventeenth century in England and Northern Europe. The early seventeenth century was a particularly rich time for biblical art (for example, Rembrandt and his followers as well as other prolific Dutch artists) and very many of the paintings from this period are now on location in London, especially in the National Gallery. Preference will be given to discussions of paintings and other forms of distinctive biblical art that can be viewed in London, either in museums, galleries, churches or synagogues or in public squares throughout the city.

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Bible in Eastern and Oriental Orthodox Traditions

Vahan Hovhanessian
Description: This program unit will offer a forum for biblical professors and scholars from the Eastern and Oriental Orthodox traditions (the latter including Aramaic, Syriac, Armenian, Arabic, Georgian, Coptic, among others) to engage in critical study of the role of the Bible in eastern Christianity, past and present. A particular aim of this section will be to engage participating scholars in dealing with issues raised by contemporary and critical biblical scholarship. The committee invites presentation and discussion of papers from a variety of approaches and methodologies, including (but not limited to) theological, historiographic, philological, and literary studies.

Call for papers: Our unit’s theme for the 2011 International Conference in London, UK is: “The reception, translation and use of the Septuagint in the versions of the Bible in the Eastern and Oriental Orthodox churches.” Scholars are invited to submit proposals of papers that will examine the role that these versions can play in better understanding the MS text or resolving textual critical issues. The steering committee of the unit especially encourages the submission of proposals for papers that will rediscover, or shed light on, the exegetical praxis of the early Church and discuss the insights into contemporary biblical exegesis and scholarship that the distinct tradition of biblical interpretation of these churches may provide.

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Biblical and Ancient Near Eastern Law

Gary Knoppers
Reinhard Achenbach
Description: The purpose of the Biblical and Ancient Near Eastern Law Section is to promote interdisciplinary research on ancient Near Eastern, biblical, and post-biblical law. Methodological perspectives include historical-critical, literary, legal-historical, feminist, and social-scientific approaches.

Call for papers: This unit will sponsor two sessions at the 2011 meeting in London. The first will be a special session devoted to the recently-discovered al-Yahudu cuneiform tablets dating to the Neo-Babylonian and Persian periods. A number of scholars working firsthand with this material will be discussing both general and specialized issues pertaining to the legal, literary, and historical aspects of these fascinating texts. The second session will be open to scholars discussing academic issues pertaining to biblical and ancient Near Eastern law. Some preference will be given to papers devoted to the Neo-Babylonian and Achaemenid periods.

Tags: Law (Comparative Religion / History of Religion), Law Codes & Legal Documents (Ancient Near Eastern Literature - Genre)

Biblical Characters in Three Traditions (Judaism, Christianity, Islam)

John Tracy Greene
Description: This seminar approaches biblical literature through its most famous and pivotal characters, for it is around them that the subsequent biblical story is organized and arranged. Moreover, these characters have come to enjoy a life and fame that extends well beyond the basic Old Testament, Miqra, and New Testament, and even into the Qur’an and Islamic oral and written texts. As was demonstrated at the recent Tartu seminar, Samaritan texts and traditions (unfamiliar to many) have a contribution to make to the seminar as well. Our work seeks, among other goals, to facilitate a meaningful and informed dialogue between Jews, Christians, Muslims and Samaritans—foregrounded in the academic study of the treatment of characters across texts and traditions—by providing both an open forum at annual conferences, and by providing through our publications a written reference library to consult. A further goal is to encourage and provide a forum in which new scholarly talent in biblical and related studies may be presented.

Call for papers: The general theme is The Suffering of a Righteous Person: Job in Three Traditions. Among the questions we shall discuss are: Why do human beings suffer?, Does the story of Job indeed represent human suffering?, Why do we complain when we suffer?, Who is to be blamed for our suffering, especially when we feel it is undeserved? It is not an easy task to answer these questions. The first reaction is to blame a certain person or a certain political event. But if they are not at hand, we search for higher authority to blame. Job complained, for instance: “God has delivered me to the ungodly and turned me over into the hand of the wicked” (16:11). Was he right to lay blame on God for causing him to fall into the hand of the wicked? Our seminar will examine the suffering of a righteous man through the literary works of the three traditions, literature, art, and music.

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Biblical Interpretation in Early Christianity

D. Jeffrey Bingham
Description: This program unit explores the interpretative structures, methodologies, and concerns of patristic exegesis and the various assumptions underlying it.

Call for papers: This unit especially invites paper proposals on the Apocalypse of John in early Christian interpretation, but will also consider proposals which contribute to our understanding of the structures, methodologies, concerns and assumptions functioning within patristic readings of other biblical texts.

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Biblical Theology

Description: The unit explores the hermeneutical innovations and theological implications of the location of critical biblical interpretation within the confessional communities of the various traditions. Particular attention is given to the relationship between systematic theology, practical theology, philosophical theology, and biblical studies, with respect to their nature and status as discrete disciplines.

Call for papers: Forthcoming

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Catholic Epistles

Felix H. Cortez
Description: This unit provides a forum for sharing original research regarding all aspects of and approaches to the interpretation of the Catholic Epistles (James, 1–2 Peter, 1–3 John, and Jude) as a collection or individual letters, including a variety of critical methodologies and especially welcome studies demonstrating interdisciplinary approaches.

Call for papers: This section has a wide object of study, a total of 10 epistles (1 & 2 Timothy, Titus, James, 1 & 2 Peter, 1, 2, 3 John, and Jude). Its aim is to promote the study of these epistles in at least four ways: (1) exploring new approaches to their study, (2) suggesting solutions to exegetical, literary, text critical, historical, and theological problems associated with them, (3) highlighting new areas of research, and (4) evaluating the significance of the history of their scholarship. Proposals on any of these topics are welcomed.

Tags: Hebrews and Catholic Epistle (Biblical Literature - New Testament), Hebrews and Catholic Epistles - 1 John (Biblical Literature - New Testament), Hebrews and Catholic Epistles - 1 Peter (Biblical Literature - New Testament), Hebrews and Catholic Epistles - 2 John (Biblical Literature - New Testament), Hebrews and Catholic Epistles - 2 Peter (Biblical Literature - New Testament), Hebrews and Catholic Epistles - 3 John (Biblical Literature - New Testament), Hebrews and Catholic Epistles - Hebrews (Biblical Literature - New Testament), Hebrews and Catholic Epistles - James (Biblical Literature - New Testament), Hebrews and Catholic Epistles - Jude (Biblical Literature - New Testament)

Comparative Studies of Literature from the Persian and Hellenistic Periods

Alice W. Hunt
Louis C. Jonker
Description: This section, titled Historical Books (Hebrew Bible) through 2011, encourages comparative studies of literature from the Persian and Hellenistic Periods in order to map the common trends (theological; socio-psychological; rhetorical; etc.) occurring in historiographical (biblical; apocryphal; extra-biblical), prophetic and wisdom literature of the period.

Call for papers: The focus at the London conference will be on the issue of the GENRE of historiography. What is historiography? What are the characteristics? Can influences from other contemporary cultures be detected in the biblical historiographies? What function(s) did biblical historiographies serve? We plan to have two sessions at this conference, and we therefore invite proposals that will address any of these (or related) issues.

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Concept Analysis and the Hebrew Bible

Won W. Lee
Description: The unit examines concepts that unify particular textual units or books in the Hebrew Bible and the interrelationship of competing concepts within the same book or corpus in the Hebrew Bible (e.g., God's love and hate; peace and violence; wealth and poverty).

Call for papers: Forthcoming

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Contextual Interpretation of the Bible (Hebrew Bible/Old Testament and New Testament)

Athalya Brenner-Idan
Archie C. C. Lee
Daniel Patte
Jeremy Punt
Kari Latvus
Description: The goal of this Consultation is to explore the interest in developing a SBL seminar or section on Contextual Biblical Interpretation, its different strategies (including “inculturation,” inter(con)textualization, and reading with “ordinary” readers) and its methodological justifications, and the extent to which all interpretations are contextual. We are especially interested in seemingly “marginal” (from the geographical, gender, faith, class, age, communal and so forth) aspects and in community.

Call for papers: This is an on-going contracted publication project. Continuing to develop the book series TEXTS@CONTEXTS (Fortress Press; volume on GENESIS, published beginning of 2010 and THE GOSPEL OF MARK, forthcoming, 2010), we seek papers on *contextual* biblical interpretations (readings of the Bible that take the present-day readers’ contexts into account in some meaningful way) in preparation for new volumes. Particularly (but not exclusively) we are interested in contextual readings of the following biblical books (focused on possible themes): EXODUS –DEUTERONOMY and LEVITICUS-NUMBERS (territory and identity, “law” and praxis, divine names, ritual and magic, taboos, gender and family), JOSHUA-JUDGES (conquest and liberation: whose side are you on?); the Gospels of JOHN (identity, honor and shame, hybridity, community); MATTHEW (land/landowners/laborers and empire, children/parents/family, disabilities/miracles, border-crossing, community) and 1 & 2 CORINTHIANS (unity, diversity, identity, cross, holiness, Lord’s Supper). We shall also accept papers on other biblical texts, in preparation for future volum, provided their contextual contents and methodologies are strong. All papers need to make explicit their "contextual" strategies (e.g. inculturation, inter[con]textualization, reading with others, liberation) and methodologies. For general format see http://www.vanderbilt.edu/AnS/religious_studies/GBC/outline_comm.html.

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Early Christianity and the Ancient Economy

Fika J. van Rensburg
John T. Fitzgerald
Description: The unit is the foundational component of an international, interdisciplinary project that seeks to delineate the relationship between early Christianity and the ancient economy in the period from Jesus to Justinian, demonstrating both similarities and differences in attitudes, approaches to problems, and attempted solutions.

Call for papers: The Early Christianity and Ancient Economy Section sponsors three sub-projects: The first sub-project involves a study of all the major aspects of the economy in the ancient world, especially the Roman Empire. The second sub-project examines first-century early Christianity both in relationship to the ancient economy and in regard to its own economic aspects. The third sub-project does the same for Christianity in the second to the fifth centuries. Both synchronic and diachronic studies are encouraged, as are contributions focused on specific issues (such as money), texts, authors, themes, and events. Paper proposals for all three sub-projects are welcomed, especially those that focus on the economy of Roman Britain and/or make use of papyri, inscriptions, and other realia. Those submitting a proposal should designate in the Abstract the sub-project for which the paper should be considered.

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Ecological Hermeneutics

Norman C. Habel
Peter Trudinger
Description: This unit will focus on hermeneutical principles and models for ecological readings of the biblical text and tradition. Attention would be paid to the anthropocentric bias of texts and readers as well as to discerning alternative traditions sympathetic to ecology, Earth and the Earth community. The aim is to explore the art of reading the text with empathy for the natural world.

Call for papers: This unit will focus on hermeneutical principles and models for ecological readings of the biblical text and tradition. Attention would be paid to the anthropocentric bias of texts and readers as well as to discerning alternative traditions sympathetic to ecology, Earth and the Earth community. The aim is to explore the art of reading the text with empathy for the natural world.

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Epigraphical and Paleological Studies Pertaining to the Biblical World

Meir Lubetski
Description: The unit focuses on inscriptions and icons bearing on the Bible world, with special concentration on the meaning and analysis of seals, ostraca, magic bowls, inscriptions, and scripts from the ancient Near East.

Call for papers: Papers that conentrate on the meaning and analysis of ancient Near Eastern archaeological artifacts relating to the Bible or that analyze biblical verses by using archaeological material are sought. Scholars that are researching the private collections of Shlomo Moussaieff are welcome to present their findings. Meir Lubetski , Baruch College, CUNY. Meir_Lubetski@baruch.cuny.edu. 646 312 4212.

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Epistle to the Hebrews

David M. Moffitt
Eric F. Mason
Description: This unit is designed to encourage conversation about the historical, hermeneutical, and theological issues raised in Hebrews. Special attention will be given to papers that engage topics relevant to the portion of the Epistle under consideration each year.

Call for papers: Proposals are welcome for papers on any topic related to study of Hebrews. A special session with prearranged papers will address Heb 13, especially its relationship to and significance for interpreting the book as a whole.

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European Research Centre for Ancient East-Mediterranean Cultures (CAMC)

Thomas Kämmerer
Description: The European Research Center for Ancient East-Mediterranean Cultures (CAMC) is structured as a joint venture between the University of Tartu, Estonia, the University of Münster, Germany, and the University of Helsinki, Finland, and has its seat at the Faculty of Philosophy of the University of Tartu. Juridically it is a Consortium of the following chairs / departments: 1. Ancient Near Eastern Studies, Tartu, 2. Old Testament, Tartu, 3. New Testament, Tartu 4. Classical Philology, Tartu, 5. Ancient History, Tartu, Besides the academic research and teaching at these three Universities the CAMC has officially the status of the "Baltic Branch of the Fondazione Mediterraneo", Naples, and is thus one of the leading Estonian-German bodies which is responsible for the cultural and social co-operation between Estonian and German academic institutions and the Anna Lindh foundation for the dialogue between cultures, the Swedish Institute, both located in Alexandria and the Fondazione Mediterraneo in Naples, Italy. Its domicile is located at the Faculty of Philosophy of the University of Tartu, Estonia. The objectives of CAMC are established as set out in the statutes of both, the University of Tartu and the Fondazione Mediterraneo, Naples, which will be proposed to the institutions of the partnership. The main objectives are generally: -to identify, develop and promote areas of cultural and historical convergence between the countries and peoples of the Mediterranean on the academic level. -to hold a close and regular dialogue between Mediterranean academic institutions and those of Estonia, Finland and Germany, by promoting the understanding of Mediterranean culture. -to serve as a catalyst for promoting cultural cooperation and mobility between Mediterranean and Finno-Ugric speaking people on different levels (e.g. scholar, student exchange, etc.) targeting in particular the young and activities relevant to young academic people.

Call for papers: The European Research Center for Ancient East-Mediterranean Cultures (CAMC) is structured as a joint venture between the University of Tartu, Estonia, the University of Münster, Germany, and the University of Helsinki, Finland, and has its seat at the Faculty of Philosophy of the University of Tartu. Juridically it is a Consortium of the following chairs / departments: 1. Ancient Near Eastern Studies, Tartu, 2. Old Testament, Tartu, 3. New Testament, Tartu 4. Classical Philology, Tartu, 5. Ancient History, Tartu, Besides the academic research and teaching at these three Universities the CAMC has officially the status of the "Baltic Branch of the Fondazione Mediterraneo", Naples, and is thus one of the leading Estonian-German bodies which is responsible for the cultural and social co-operation between Estonian and German academic institutions and the Anna Lindh foundation for the dialogue between cultures, the Swedish Institute, both located in Alexandria and the Fondazione Mediterraneo in Naples, Italy. Its domicile is located at the Faculty of Philosophy of the University of Tartu, Estonia. The objectives of CAMC are established as set out in the statutes of both, the University of Tartu and the Fondazione Mediterraneo, Naples, which will be proposed to the institutions of the partnership. The main objectives are generally: -to identify, develop and promote areas of cultural and historical convergence between the countries and peoples of the Mediterranean on the academic level. -to hold a close and regular dialogue between Mediterranean academic institutions and those of Estonia, Finland and Germany, by promoting the understanding of Mediterranean culture. -to serve as a catalyst for promoting cultural cooperation and mobility between Mediterranean and Finno-Ugric speaking people on different levels (e.g. scholar, student exchange, etc.) targeting in particular the young and activities relevant to young academic people.

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Expressions of Religion in Israel

Françoise Mirguet
Mark Alan Christian
Description: Formerly titled "Israelite Religion," this program unit focuses on the broad scope of Israelite religion and cult beginning with the first temple period. It provides a forum for scholars to explore rapidly expanding conceptions of "Israelite religion." Contributors interpret biblical traditions and artifactual discoveries in Israel in the light of comparable traditions and material evidences in neighboring countries.

Call for papers: For the 2011 London meeting the Expressions of Israelite Religion program unit will host two sessions, a closed session of invited papers and an open session. The overarching theme will be the representation of the divine in literature, epigraphy, and material culture of Ancient Israel and the ancient Near East. The theme includes the following topics, without being limited to them: The deity’s embodiment, gender, emotions, activities, and the means/agencies through which these characteristics, attributes, and behaviors are presented. Another line of questioning could pursue time/space aspects of a deity. The open session especially encourages papers that look into the formation of problematic theologies, for example, the dark side of the god(s) within the West Semitic pantheon, e.g., at Ugarit and Israel.

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Families and Children in the Ancient World

Anna Rebecca Solevag
Christian Laes
Mikael Larsson
Reidar Aasgaard
Description: This unit provides a forum for presenting and discussing issues related to families, children and biblical literature. The section is open to presentations on the Hebrew Bible, the Christian Testament and early Christian, Rabbinic and Greco-Roman material from a variety of perspectives and using a variety of methods.

Call for papers: The unit is planning for two sessions in London. One will have an open call on any relevant topic. The other calls for papers on the roles of children in relation to other family members, such as parents, siblings, (fellow) slaves, the elderly, etc.

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Feminist Interpretations

Irmtraud Fischer
Description: The aim of this unit is to provide a forum for research in issues and questions relating to feminist methods of interpretation. While specifically focused on methodological concerns, we are also concerned to ground that reflection in the reality of engagement with specific texts.

Call for papers: For the 2011 SBL IM in London, the Feminist Interpretations unit will organize four sessions. 1) Open call: We invite papers on methodological issues specifically relating to exegesis in feminist interpretation and gender studies. Papers are invited on divergent methodologies (e.g., historical critical, narratology, intertextuality…) and their relevance for gender studies. 2) Invitations will comprise a session on feminist exegesis and cultural studies, specifically on the reception history of gender relevant themes and texts of the Bible. 3) Open call: Feminist exegesis and traditional exegesis - two separate fields? After more than 30 years of scientific feminist exegesis there are still publications of traditional exegesis reading not even any of the publications done by women with gender awareness. This session calls for papers that reflect the relationsship of feminist and traditional exegesis and the lack of reception of Gender studies, especially in research done based on historical critical methods, but also gaps in feminist exegesis concerning themes or methods. 4) Open call: Junior section of gender relevant exegesis. In this section we expect papers of young researchers presenting their studies.

Tags: Gender and Sexuality Criticism (incl. Feminist, Womanist, Masculinity Studies, Queer Theory) (Interpretive Approaches)

Forced-Return Migrations (Exile-Return) in Biblical Literature

John Ahn
Martien A. Halvorson-Taylor
Description: The forced migration and return migrations periods (exile-return) have been prominent for biblical literature. This new International Consultation fosters research and dialogue on displacement and resettlement issues pertaining to the 6th and 5th centuries B.C.E. We welcome traditional historical, literary, redactional, sociological, post-, paleoclimateological, theological and others methods toward a better understanding of these periods. Studies on the metaphor of exile or forced and return migration studies: im/migration, intergeneration, acculturation, assimilation, transnationalism, development induced displacement, internal displacement, refugee, repatriation, disaporic homecoming, ethnic return studies—are highly encouraged.

Call for papers: An invited session entitled "In Search of Captivity as Forced Migrations" is planned. We also extend a warm open invitation for papers that deal with "Memory of Exile-Forced Migrations" from all methodological approaches in the HB/OT, DSS, Intertestamental, and the NT.

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Greco-Roman World

Michael Joseph Brown
Description: The unit provides a forum for discussing ancient texts, artifacts and concepts from the Hellenistic and Roman worlds and relating them to the study of the New Testament world.

Call for papers: This unit discusses ancient texts, artifacts, and concepts from the Greco-Roman world. Although we will consider papers from across the entire spectrum of the Greco-Roman world, we are most interested in papers that focus on Roman Britain for this international meeting.

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Healthcare and Disability in the Ancient World

Candida R. Moss
Joel S. Baden
Laura M. Zucconi
Description: The unit seeks to foster scholarship related to disability in all fields of biblical studies. Major areas of concern include medical history of the Ancient Near East and Greco-Roman worlds; the religious, legal, and cultural status of people with disabilities in the biblical and formative Jewish and Christian periods; the representation of disability in biblical and cognate texts, biblical theology of the same, and disability in the history of biblical interpretation.

Call for papers: The Unit plans to have several sessions at the 2011 meeting. Paper proposals are welcome on any aspect of the study of health and disability related to the Bible. Major areas of concern include medical history of the Ancient Near East and Greco-Roman worlds; the religious, legal, and cultural status of people with disabilities or healthcare providers in the biblical and formative Jewish and Christian periods; the representation of disability in biblical and cognate texts, biblical theology of the same, and disability in the history of biblical interpretation.

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Hellenistic Greek Language and Linguistics

Albert L. Lukaszewski
Paul Danove
Peter Spitaler
Description: Hellenistic Greek forms the basis of studies relative to both testaments as well as much of the ancient world. This section welcomes papers on any aspect of the Greek found in the Septuagint, New Testament, or other Hellenistic literature. Linguistic, grammatical and lexical studies are particularly encouraged.

Call for papers: The Hellenistic Greek Language and Linguistics Section welcomes papers on any aspect of the Greek found in the Septuagint, New Testament, or other Hellenistic literature. Linguistic, grammatical and lexical studies are particularly encouraged.

Tags: Greek - Attic (Philology / Linguistics (incl. Semiotics)), Greek - Koine (LXX, NT, Patristics) (Philology / Linguistics (incl. Semiotics))

Hellenistic Judaism

Ljubica Jovanovic
Stephen Herring
Description: This section is dedicated to the study of all aspects of Judaism related to Hellenistic times. The Hellenistic period includes its chronological, cultural, and linguistic dimensions.

Call for papers: The celebration of the 400 year anniversary of the KJV reminds the English speaking world of the impact that the English translation of the Bible had in promoting English culture and language around the world. The earliest known translation of the Hebrew Bible was in Greek and was a product of the Hellenistic world. The influence of the Septuagint on Judaic and Christian culture and literature is comparable to that of the KJV in more recent history. In this light, papers that specifically address the importance of the Septuagint/LXX as the beginning of the national literature are especially welcome in this celebratory year of translations and interpretations. Also, in a broader context, we are looking for papers that deal with the availability of sacred scripture in the dominant imperial language in relation to globalization. Of course, all papers on any aspect of Judaism in the Hellenistic period are always welcome.

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Ideology, Culture, and Translation

Christina Petterson
Description: This Group explores theoretical dimensions and implications of translations and translation practice. Critical engagements with the translation, translation practices, or translation history of any texts relevant to the study of Bible and Christianity (ancient and modern) are welcome.

Call for papers: For the 2011 London meeting the general theme will be the King James Bible. We invite papers that explore the ideology of the King James translation, e.g. the relation to sovereignty; the emerging national identity and/or its role in state formation; the cultures it influenced - domestic as well as colonial contexts; or papers dealing with the translation of the text in light of the above.

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Johannine Literature

Yak-Hwee Tan
Description: The unit promotes the study of the Johannine literature, a major component of the Christian Scripture; addressing the issues and concerns having to do with the analysis and interpretation of the literature.

Call for papers: We invite submission of papers on any topic related to Johannine literature, encompassing the Fourth Gospel and the three Johannine letters.

Tags: Gospels - John (Biblical Literature - New Testament)

Judaica

Rivka Ulmer
Description: The unit draws together scholars from around the world to explore diverse issues that are related to Hebrew Scripture in its relationship to ancient, medieval, and modern Judaisms: medieval lexicography and poetics, musical exegesis, philosophy, and the study of the Talmud in the Far East.

Call for papers: The Judaica program unit will accept papers in the general area of Jewish Bible interpretation. If possible, papers may reflect the region's important contribution to Jewish Studies. One session will be dedicated to Jewish Bible interpretation and a second session will accept papers in Judaica.

Tags: Ancient Near East - Iron Age (History & Culture), Apocalyptic Literature and Related Works (Early Jewish Literature - Jewish Pseudepigrapha), Art, Film, Music, and Literature (History of Interpretation / Reception History / Reception Criticism), Babylonian Talmud (Early Jewish Literature - Rabbinic Literature), Biblical Interpretations (Early Jewish Literature - Dead Sea Scrolls), Biblical Texts (Early Jewish Literature - Dead Sea Scrolls), Comparative Approaches (Interpretive Approaches), Dead Sea Scrolls (Early Jewish Literature - Dead Sea Scrolls), Expansions of the Old Testament and Other Legends (Early Jewish Literature - Jewish Pseudepigrapha), Hebrew (classical) (Philology / Linguistics (incl. Semiotics)), Hymns and Prayers (Early Jewish Literature - Dead Sea Scrolls), Jerusalem Talmud (Early Jewish Literature - Rabbinic Literature), Jewish (Ideology & Theology), Jewish Pseudepigrapha (Early Jewish Literature - Jewish Pseudepigrapha), Josephus (Early Jewish Literature - Other), Legal Writings (Early Jewish Literature - Dead Sea Scrolls), Lexicography (Text and Translation), Literary Criticism (incl. poetics, new criticism, formalism, close reading, narratology) (Interpretive Approaches), Mishnah (Early Jewish Literature - Rabbinic Literature), Nonliterary Texts (lists, contracts) (Early Jewish Literature - Dead Sea Scrolls), Other Jewish Compositions (e.g., 1 Enoch) (Early Jewish Literature - Dead Sea Scrolls), Other Rabbinic Works - Exegetical Midrashim (Early Jewish Literature - Rabbinic Literature), Other Rabbinic Works - Haggadic Midrashim (Early Jewish Literature - Rabbinic Literature), Other Rabbinic Works - Halakic Midrashim (Early Jewish Literature - Rabbinic Literature), Other Rabbinic Works - Homiletical Midrashim (Early Jewish Literature - Rabbinic Literature), Other Texts (Early Jewish Literature - Other), Philo (Early Jewish Literature - Other), Prayers, Psalms, and Odes (Early Jewish Literature - Jewish Pseudepigrapha), Rabbinic Literature (Early Jewish Literature - Rabbinic Literature), Rule Documents (Early Jewish Literature - Dead Sea Scrolls), Sectarian Texts (Early Jewish Literature - Dead Sea Scrolls), Targumic Texts (Early Jewish Literature - Rabbinic Literature), Testaments (Early Jewish Literature - Jewish Pseudepigrapha), Tosefta (Early Jewish Literature - Rabbinic Literature), Wisdom and Philosophical Literature (Early Jewish Literature - Jewish Pseudepigrapha)

Methods in New Testament Studies

Markus Lang
Description: The unit is devoted to the exploration and application of new methods to the New Testament text. The use of literary critical methods is encouraged. The goal of the unit is to develop new ways to understand the development of the early Christian community.

Call for papers: The range of papers that can be proposed spreds far: from further developement or criticism of the traditional methods and social criticism to special interests like linguistics and feminism.

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Mind, Society, and Tradition

Istvan Czachesz
Risto Uro
Description: This program unit aims to initiate cross-disciplinary theory-forming in biblical studies and a dialogue between social-scientific methods and the so-called cognitive science of religion. The cognitive science of religion is a new multidisciplinary field that emerged in the 1990s. It examines cross-culturally recurrent patterns in religious thought, experience, and practice, explaining these regularities in terms of the architecture of the human mind. This field has opened up new ways of understanding religiosity in general, as well as the emergence and development of religious movements, sometimes challenging established theories in classical anthropology and comparative religion. These developments have potential relevance for biblical studies. The program unit welcomes papers using social-scientific or cognitive approaches, or their combination. Of particular interest are studies focusing on the interaction between mind and society, cognition and culture, as well as on the transmission of religious knowledge. Relevant theories and areas include memory studies, social identity theory, evolutionary psychology, neuroscience, ritual theories, models of counterintuitiveness, theory of mind, social cognition, emotion, and religious experience. The program unit welcomes papers using either traditional social-scientific or new cognitive approaches, or their combination. Of particular interest are studies focusing on interaction between mind and society, cognition and culture, as well as on the transmission of religious knowledge. Relevant theories and areas include memory studies, social identity theory, evolutionary psychology, neuroscience, ritual theories, models of counterintuitiveness, theory of mind, social cognition, emotion, and religious experience. For more information, visit http://blogs.helsinki.fi/mindsocietyreligion/.

Call for papers: In the 2011 International Meeting, the Mind, Society and Tradition program unit will be organizing two sessions. The theme of the first is "Language and Mind in Biblical Exegesis," which is both of central importance for cognitive approaches to the Bible and most suitable to participate in the celebration of the King James Bible. We are especially welcoming papers on translation theory, ritual and linguistics, speech-act theory and religion, cognitive linguistics, modularity of the mind, evolutionary approaches to language and religion, and Chomsky's influence on the social sciences and humanities -- but prospective speakers with other relevant topics are also encouraged to submit a proposal. For the second session, we are inviting proposals dealing with social-scientific and/or cognitive approaches in the study of biblical texts and traditions, as stated in the description of the program unit.

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Nag Hammadi and Gnosticism

Nicola Denzey Lewis
Nicola Denzey Lewis
Description: The Nag Hammadi and Gnosticism Section provides a forum for current international research on the Coptic codices discovered at Nag Hammadi, Egypt, in 1945. Research areas include: issues of text and translation; analysis and interpretation of the tractates; codicological analysis; background and provenance of the manuscripts; studies relevant to the larger social and religio-historical contexts of the Nag Hammadi texts, especially their relation to Jewish, Christian and Greco-Roman religious traditions.

Call for papers: For the 2011 International Meeting in London, we are soliciting papers on any topic on Nag Hammadi and Gnosticism, but preference will be given to papers on reception history and the intersection and interpretation of biblical texts.

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Nonbiblical Dead Sea Scrolls: Themes and Perspectives

Alison Schofield
Eibert Tigchelaar
Description: This unit provides a forum for scholars to engage in critical discussion concerning the non-biblical Dead Sea Scrolls. The consultation encourages presentations that employ diverse methodological and theoretical perspectives on the Scrolls with the hope that consequent interpretations will be fresh and appropriate. Such a forum will also allow scholars to employ insights from various disciplines, including but not limited to, the social sciences, critical theory, literary and cultural studies, intertextuality and early biblical interpretation, and other thematic studies, and to consider the methodological issues associated with this task.

Call for papers: This unit welcomes proposals for papers on the non-biblical Dead Sea Scrolls and encourages critical discussion from a wide range of disciplines and perspectives. The 2011 session is entitled Images of the Feminine in the Dead Sea Scrolls, and papers on any aspects of women, gender, or presentations of the feminine in the Dead Sea Scrolls are welcome. Papers might consider the archaeological, historical or legal presence of women associated with the Scrolls and/or the discursive presence of women and images of the feminine in the literary space of these texts. Scholars are also invited to reflect on methodological concerns raised with the study of women and gender at Qumran.

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Palestine and Babylon: Two Jewish Late Antique Cultures and Their Interrelation

Ronit Nikolsky
Description: This section focuses on the uniqueness of the Palestinian and the Babylonian rabbinic cultures, and traces their interrelation: what are typical, or original, Palestinian exegetical, Halakhic and narrative traditions; what are the characteristics, of the Babylonian rabbinic culture, its development and crystallization; how and when did the Babylonian culture gain prominence in the Jewish culture of the Byzantine and Medieval periods.

Call for papers: This year this program unit will concentrate on the TANHUMA corpus. Tanhuma is a wide and diverse corpus of literature created by rabbinic culture in the Land of Israel roughly at the same period as the Babylonian Talmud. Although the Tanhuma was a wide spread and dominant literary corpus, it fell into oblivion at some point during the following centuries, ‘losing’ the place to the Talmud in Medieval Europe, and to other more ‘classical’ midrashim in modern scholarship. The aim of these series of session of the SBL is to call attention again to the Tanhuma corpus, and to the culture that it represents. At the first stage we would like to keep the scope of presentations as wide as possible, tackling all the aspects that can be studied about the Tanhuma; here are some possible topics: a definition or description of the Tanhuma corpus * the poetics of the Tanhuma * the Tanhuma and the Babylonian Talmud * Tanhuma’s journey into Europe * the representation of the Tanhuma in the Geniza * the culture which is represented in the Tanhuma * non-rabbinic influences on the Tanhuma * halacha and custom in Tanhuma * sources of the Tanhuma * the place of the Tanhuma on the Jewish-rabbinic cultural continuum. The idea is to invite the scholars that are working on the Tanhuma to participate regularly and discuss and learn this particular corpus, and hopefully come up with good quality publications, or even a common project.

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Paul and Pauline Literature

Jerry L. Sumney
Description: The unit provides a forum for presentation and discussion of original scholarly research on all facets of the interpretation of the Pauline Corpus in the New Testament. This includes consideration of exegetical, socio-historical, history of religions, theological, literary, history of interpretation, and methodological questions.

Call for papers: The unit provides a forum for presentation and discussion of original scholarly research on all facets of the interpretation of the Pauline Corpus in the New Testament. This includes consideration of exegetical, socio-historical, history of religions, theological, literary, history of interpretation, and methodological questions.

Tags: Pauline Epistles (Biblical Literature - New Testament), Pauline Epistles - 1 Corinthians (Biblical Literature - New Testament), Pauline Epistles - 1 Thessalonians (Biblical Literature - New Testament), Pauline Epistles - 1 Timothy (Biblical Literature - New Testament), Pauline Epistles - 2 Corinthians (Biblical Literature - New Testament), Pauline Epistles - 2 Thessalonians (Biblical Literature - New Testament), Pauline Epistles - 2 Timothy (Biblical Literature - New Testament), Pauline Epistles - Colossians (Biblical Literature - New Testament), Pauline Epistles - Ephesians (Biblical Literature - New Testament), Pauline Epistles - Galatians (Biblical Literature - New Testament), Pauline Epistles - Philemon (Biblical Literature - New Testament), Pauline Epistles - Philippians (Biblical Literature - New Testament), Pauline Epistles - Romans (Biblical Literature - New Testament), Pauline Epistles - Titus (Biblical Literature - New Testament)

Pentateuch (Torah)

Alan J. Hauser
Dr. F. Rachel Magdalene
Description: The unit provides a forum for presentation and discussion of research on the Pentateuch / Torah, with a particular focus on transmission-historical issues and linkage of that area of inquiry with other more synchronic methodologies.

Call for papers: As in previous years, all papers on the Pentateuch (Torah) are welcome, with special emphasis on recent developments in methodological approaches to the Pentateuch. For the meeting in London in 2011, there will be a special session devoted to British scholarship's impact on the development of Pentateuch scholarship. Also, in memory of Jacob J. Milgrom and in honor of his work on Leviticus, we ask for papers on the book of Leviticus for a special panel. Papers on any topic in Leviticus, using any method, traditional or new, are encouraged.

Tags: Torah/Pentateuch (Biblical Literature - Hebrew Bible/Old Testament/Greek OT (Septuagint)), Torah/Pentateuch - Deuteronomy (Biblical Literature - Hebrew Bible/Old Testament/Greek OT (Septuagint)), Torah/Pentateuch - Exodus (Biblical Literature - Hebrew Bible/Old Testament/Greek OT (Septuagint)), Torah/Pentateuch - Genesis (Biblical Literature - Hebrew Bible/Old Testament/Greek OT (Septuagint)), Torah/Pentateuch - Leviticus (Biblical Literature - Hebrew Bible/Old Testament/Greek OT (Septuagint)), Torah/Pentateuch - Numbers (Biblical Literature - Hebrew Bible/Old Testament/Greek OT (Septuagint))

Persian Period

James Nogalski
Jon L. Berquist
Description: This seminar focuses on the history and literature of Yehud in the context of the Persian period, 539-333 BCE. We have particular interests in imperialism and its effects, pluralism within the period, practices of religion within the household, and the development of temple, cult, and canon.

Call for papers: This seminar focuses on the history and literature of Yehud in the context of the Persian period, 539-333 BCE. We have particular interests in imperialism and its effects, pluralism within the period, practices of religion within the household, and the development of temple, cult, and canon.

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Place, Space, and Identity in the Ancient Mediterranean World

Christl M. Maier
Gert T. M. Prinsloo
Description: Investigates the inherent spatiality of human existence and how it affects human behavior, ideology, identity, and orientation. Ancient Mediterranean texts and societies are studied from a decidedly spatial perspective. Different approaches to spatiality will enrich investigations, e.g. narratological space, critical spatiality, sociological theories on space, space and identity, space and body.

Call for papers: In London, we plan two sessions, both of which combine invited papers and an open call. The first, a joint session with the Apocalyptic Literature section, entitled "Apocalyptic Space", welcomes papers that analyze space in biblical or non-biblical apocalyptic texts. Preference will be given to papers combining spatial theories and textual analysis. In this regard the notion of "utopian" space in apocalyptic literature is a theme that can be explored. The second session focuses on The Interrelation between Space and Identity seeking papers that address issues of identity formation that are connected to space in texts, archaeological contexts or iconographic traditions. Ideally, theses papers would combine spatial analysis with the question of identity.

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Political Biblical Criticism

Fernando F. Segovia
Jeremy Punt
Description: The unit seeks to pursue, on the one hand, the task of criticism, its vision and mission, in the contemporary world and, on the other hand, the development of a political approach, globalsystemic in orientation, to focus on major crises of the world—migration, inequality, climate—bringing together thereby, in interdisciplinary fashion, Biblical Studies and such other fields as Migration Studies, Economic Studies, and Climate Studies.

Call for papers: The 2011 International Meeting, with its commemoration of the fourth centenary of the King James Bible, offers a most appropriate setting for its launching. Papers are invited that investigate the relationship between biblical criticism and cultural contexts and approaches. Contributions that focus on ideological approaches will be particularly welcomed.

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Professional Issues

Heather A. McKay
Martin Ehrensvärd
Description: When a scholar takes up a new appointment (or a postgraduate student joins an existing department) there is more to 'fitting in' than finding a desk, a computer and access to the photocopier. There is also the need to build a place in discussions, a role in meetings, a respect for and valuing of his/her skills/ commitment/ discipline/ methodology/ etc

Call for papers: We are looking for 10 minute - ideally provocative or questioning - submissions on the topic: "Successful Ways of Developing Oneself and Others" for this workshop session where members can both make contributions and/or gain from the contributions of others in this workshop style session.

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Prophets

Joachim Schaper
Description: This unit aims to provide an open forum for scholars to present papers on a variety of topics germane to the study of ancient Israelite prophecy and prophetic literature.

Call for papers: This unit aims to provide an open forum for scholars to present papers on a variety of topics germane to the study of ancient Israelite prophecy and prophetic literature.

Tags: Former Prophets (Biblical Literature - Hebrew Bible/Old Testament/Greek OT (Septuagint)), Former Prophets - 1-2 Kings (Biblical Literature - Hebrew Bible/Old Testament/Greek OT (Septuagint)), Former Prophets - 1-2 Samuel (Biblical Literature - Hebrew Bible/Old Testament/Greek OT (Septuagint)), Former Prophets - Judges (Biblical Literature - Hebrew Bible/Old Testament/Greek OT (Septuagint)), Former Prophets -Joshua (Biblical Literature - Hebrew Bible/Old Testament/Greek OT (Septuagint)), Latter Prophets (not including The Twelve) (Biblical Literature - Hebrew Bible/Old Testament/Greek OT (Septuagint)), Latter Prophets - Ezekiel (Biblical Literature - Hebrew Bible/Old Testament/Greek OT (Septuagint)), Latter Prophets - Isaiah (Biblical Literature - Hebrew Bible/Old Testament/Greek OT (Septuagint)), Latter Prophets - Jeremiah (Biblical Literature - Hebrew Bible/Old Testament/Greek OT (Septuagint)), Latter Prophets - The Twelve (Biblical Literature - Hebrew Bible/Old Testament/Greek OT (Septuagint)), Latter Prophets - The Twelve - Amos (Biblical Literature - Hebrew Bible/Old Testament/Greek OT (Septuagint)), Latter Prophets - The Twelve - Habakkuk (Biblical Literature - Hebrew Bible/Old Testament/Greek OT (Septuagint)), Latter Prophets - The Twelve - Haggai (Biblical Literature - Hebrew Bible/Old Testament/Greek OT (Septuagint)), Latter Prophets - The Twelve - Hosea (Biblical Literature - Hebrew Bible/Old Testament/Greek OT (Septuagint)), Latter Prophets - The Twelve - Joel (Biblical Literature - Hebrew Bible/Old Testament/Greek OT (Septuagint)), Latter Prophets - The Twelve - Johah (Biblical Literature - Hebrew Bible/Old Testament/Greek OT (Septuagint)), Latter Prophets - The Twelve - Malachi (Biblical Literature - Hebrew Bible/Old Testament/Greek OT (Septuagint)), Latter Prophets - The Twelve - Micah (Biblical Literature - Hebrew Bible/Old Testament/Greek OT (Septuagint)), Latter Prophets - The Twelve - Nahum (Biblical Literature - Hebrew Bible/Old Testament/Greek OT (Septuagint)), Latter Prophets - The Twelve - Obadiah (Biblical Literature - Hebrew Bible/Old Testament/Greek OT (Septuagint)), Latter Prophets - The Twelve - Zechariah (Biblical Literature - Hebrew Bible/Old Testament/Greek OT (Septuagint)), Latter Prophets - The Twelve - Zephaniah (Biblical Literature - Hebrew Bible/Old Testament/Greek OT (Septuagint))

Psychological Hermeneutics of Biblical Themes and Texts

Bas van Os
Heather A. McKay
Description: Psychological Criticism complements approaches that consider texts and their impact/s from the perspective of the reader, alongside literary, rhetorical and theological approaches, identifying how texts operate within the minds of their readers, or portray thoughts and motivations of the characters in their narratives.

Call for papers: We invite papers that take a specific psychological theory or concept and apply it to a specific (para-) biblical text, author or audience (ancient or modern, collective or individual) of that text. Papers are to be delivered in 35 minutes followed by 10 minutes of discussion. This year we welcome especially papers on "Complex characters in the Hebrew Bible".

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Qumran and the Dead Sea Scrolls

Cecilia Wassen
Sidnie White Crawford
Description: The unit provides forum for presentation and discussion of views relating to the Dead Sea Scrolls, the Qumran settlement, and the people of that place and of those documents.

Call for papers: The Qumran and Dead Sea Scrolls unit will have two sessions, one general and one thematic. 1) The general session is open to papers on a variety of topics related to the Dead Sea Scrolls and Qumran. 2) A second session will focus on the intersection of texts and archaeology at Qumran. We are interested in questions, such as ‘To what extent should the Scrolls be taken into consideration in the interpretation of the material data from Khirbet Qumran?’; ‘Why, or why not, should textual and archaeological sources be integrated when interpreting the site?’ Papers may examine the relationship between texts and archaeology from various theoretical and methodological perspectives as well as by providing concrete examples that can illuminate this issue. The thematic session will include papers by invited speakers. We welcome paper proposals for both sessions.

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Quran and Islamic Tradition in Comparative Perspective

Michael Pregill
Description: This unit seeks to foster comparative research on the Quran and Muslim culture, discourse, and devotional life. We encourage papers and panels that examine the Quran and Islamic tradition in the wider context of the history of the Western monotheisms; explore Islam’s profound historical relationships with Judaism, Christianity, and the biblical heritage; and promote comparative inquiry and intercommunal dialogue more generally.

Call for papers: The Quran and Islamic Tradition in Comparative Perspective unit of the ISBL welcomes proposals for both individual papers and pre-arranged panels. Suggested topics might include, but are not limited to: parallels to biblical, Jewish, and Christian tradition in the Quran and Islamic literature; the relationships between Jewish, Christian, and Muslim exegetical traditions; the various discursive expressions of intercommunal exchange and relations, including both dialogue and polemic; Islam in European discourse; and Muslim cultural, religious, social, and political life in the West. For the 2011 meeting in London, we especially welcome papers of a theoretical or methodological nature that explore the ramifications of the comparative study of the Bible and Jewish and Christian tradition alongside the Quran and Islamic tradition. The 2011 meeting in London will feature two special panels co-sponsored by the Institute of Ismaili Studies and the School of Oriental and African Studies in London. We welcome submissions pertaining to the themes of these panels for potential inclusion in the programme: *The Bible and the Quran in Ismaili Sources (co-sponsored by the Quran and Islamic Tradition in Comparative Perspective Unit and the Institute for Ismaili Studies; organized by Omar Ali-de-Unzaga and Michael Pregill) *The Treatment of Pre-Islamic Prophets in Historiographical and Exegetical Literature (co-sponsored by the Quran and Islamic Tradition in Comparative Perspective Unit and the School of African and Oriental Studies; organized by Marianna Klar and Michael Pregill)

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Relevance Theory and Biblical Interpretation

Gene L. Green
Ronald J. Sim
Description: The sections provides a forum for discussion on Relevance Theory perspectives on biblical narrative and hermeneutics. Topics related to the application of Relevance Theory to biblical interpretation are considered each year, as will more general essays on pragmatics and interpretation.

Call for papers: Within the broad scope noted in the Description, proposals for papers are welcomed for consideration. New approaches to Greek and Hebrew particles, metarepresentation (re-presentation or intertextuality), contextual information, verbal irony, and lexical pragmatics are an ongoing focus each year, but papers are not limited to tese topics. (Papers appropriate to the 4th centenary celebration of the role of the 1611 AV/KJV are encouraged.)

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Ritual in the Biblical World

Ada Taggar-Cohen
Russell C. D. Arnold
Description: The Ritual in the Biblical World Section focuses on the nature, meaning and function of ritual found in textual sources (HB, NT, non-canonical) in the larger context of the material culture of the ancient world, employing insights and methods of the field of ritual theory and ethnography.

Call for papers: For this international meeting we welcome proposals on all areas of ritual in the biblical world, in all ritual’s aspects.

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Status of Women in the Profession

Claudia V. Camp
Rannfrid Irene Thelle
Description: The Committee holds sessions each year exploring the nature of the profession as experienced by women biblical scholars. The goal of the sessions are to provide a forum for open discussion, networking, and the sharing of ideas.

Call for papers: Forthcoming

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Subject Centre for Philosophical and Religious Studies

Rebecca O'Loughlin
Description: The Subject Centre for Philosophical and Religious Studies (PRS) is one of 24 subject-specific centres of the Higher Education Academy, which supports UK higher education in providing the best possible learning experience for all students. We are based at the University of Leeds, but have a remit to support teachers and learners in Philosophy, Theology, Biblical Studies and Religious Studies in higher education across the UK. By doing so, we seek to enhance the educational experience of students studying in these disciplines. At the same time we promote the value of PRS approaches and knowledge to a wider audience, emphasising the relevance of PRS disciplines - and their approaches - to policy, educational research, and to learning and teaching practice in other subject areas. This programme unit is therefore concerned with supporting learning and teaching in Biblical Studies, and seeks identify, develop and disseminate enhancements in higher education practice in this field. The session facilitates the sharing of relevant, diverse and effective pedagogical practice and research in Biblical Studies in international contexts, and one of its central aims is to use the intelligence generated to inform approaches to learning and teaching the Bible in the UK.

Call for papers: The Subject Centre for Philosophical and Religious Studies invites suggestions for papers / workshops / presentations / discussion groups on any aspect of learning and teaching in Biblical Studies. Topics may include, but are not limited to: teaching methods (what works, what doesn't?); active learning; e-learning; assessment methods; special issues and / or challenges involved in teaching the Bible; and teaching the Bible in interdisciplinary contexts. We hope to publish papers from this event on the Subject Centre’s website and/or in our journal, Discourse: Learning and Teaching in Philosophical and Religious Studies. When submitting your proposal, please indicate if you would be willing to write up your paper for consideration for publication.

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Synoptic Gospels

Glenna S. Jackson
Description: The Synoptic Gospels, which have formed a coherent unit since antiquity, have played an important role in modern scholarship. This section provides an open forum for the presentation of papers, from a variety of perspectives and using a variety of methods, on these seminal religious texts.

Call for papers: The Synoptic Gospels, which have formed a coherent unit since antiquity, have played an important role in modern scholarship. This section provides an open forum for professional scholars and educators to present papers from a variety of academic perspectives and using a variety of methods. Panels are also welcome and would have a sixty-minute time allotment. Please contact Glenna S. Jackson (gjackson@otterbein.edu) if you have questions.

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The Concept of Monotheism: Should it Have a Future in Biblical Studies

Saul M. Olyan
Thomas Römer
Description: *

Call for papers: Proposals are by invitation only.

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Whence and Whither?: Methodology and the Future of Biblical Studies

Caroline Vander Stichele
Todd Penner
Description: The aim of this section is to explore the changing landscape of biblical studies in the face of post-modernity, with particular attention to the application and implications of critical theory and cultural analysis.

Call for papers: The aim of this section is to explore the changing landscape of biblical studies in the face of post-modernity, with particular attention to the application and implications of critical theory and cultural analysis.

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Wisdom Literature in the Bible and in the Ancient Near East

Tova Forti
Description: The unit seeks to encourage an ongoing discourse on new ideas and methodologies in the study of Wisdom Literature. The primary focus is on Biblical wisdom - Proverbs, Job, Qoheleth, the Wisdom Psalms and other texts influenced by wisdom ideas, as well as Ben Sira and Wisdom of Solomon. The section is also concerned with the relationship between biblical wisdom literature and cognate texts of the ancient Near East.

Call for papers: Paper proposals are welcome on any aspect (philological, literary and ideational) of the study of wisdom literature in Hebrew Scripture, the Apocrypha and Pseudepigrapha as well as ancient Near Eastern wisdom. This section promotes proposals concerning pragmatic - utilitarian teachings vis-à-vis theosophical thinking.

Tags: Ecclesiasticus (Sirach) (Biblical Literature - Deuterocanonical Works), Wisdom (Ancient Near Eastern Literature - Genre), Wisdom and Philosophical Literature (Early Jewish Literature - Jewish Pseudepigrapha), Wisdom of Solomon (Biblical Literature - Deuterocanonical Works), Writings - Ecclesiastes (Biblical Literature - Hebrew Bible/Old Testament/Greek OT (Septuagint)), Writings - Job (Biblical Literature - Hebrew Bible/Old Testament/Greek OT (Septuagint)), Writings - Proverbs (Biblical Literature - Hebrew Bible/Old Testament/Greek OT (Septuagint))

Working with Biblical Manuscripts (Textual Criticism)

Jan Krans
Tommy Wasserman
Description: This program unit is devoted to the text of “biblical” writings, as understood in the broad sense of the term: This includes the Jewish Bible, early Jewish literature, and the Old Testament (in Hebrew and Aramaic, Greek, and other ancient languages), as well as early Christian literature and the New Testament (in Greek, Latin, and other ancient languages). We offer a forum for the investigation of all types of material witnesses related to the text of this literature—tablets, manuscripts, ostraca, inscriptions—and for the consideration of the textual form of this literature reflected in its citation and use by ancient authors and in writings from antiquity through the Middle Ages. This consists not only of contributions that deal with the Hebrew, Aramaic, Greek, and Latin textual witnesses, but also those that engage evidence in Ugaritic, Arabic, Syriac, Ethiopic, Coptic, Armenian, and other linguistic traditions. A wide variety of additional issues related to textual criticism are also addressed, including epigraphy, manuscript studies, papyrology, codicology, paleography, scribal habits and the production of texts, the history of transmission (and its cultural, social, and religious settings), the practice of textual criticism from antiquity to modern times, restoration and conservation, the use of modern technology in studying this material, the production of critical editions, and discussions of particular passages.

Call for papers: Papers concentrating on any aspect of textual criticism are welcome, in particular the practical work with manuscripts. Examples of topics: papyrological insights, scribal habits, preservation techniques, technical developments, computer assisted tools, producing critical editions, evaluating the evidence of fathers or versions, discussion of particular passages, social historical studies, new projects, systematic-theological problems, teaching text-criticism in an academic setting, etc.

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Writings (including Psalms)

Donald R. Vance
Description: The aim of the unit to promote all aspects of and approaches to the study of the texts commonly referred to as the Writings (Ketuvim) in the Hebrew Bible.

Call for papers: Papers are welcome on any of the Writings, particularly those that apply newer interpretive methodologies to specific passages. Moreover, papers that address more general matters, such as the formation of the Psalter, the connection of wisdom and apocalyptic, statecraft and warfare in Chronicles/Ezra-Nehemiah, or the poetics of Classical Hebrew poetry are acceptable. For this year's conference in London we are devoting a session to the study of meter in Classical Hebrew poetry, so papers on that topic are especially encouraged.

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